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Geneva Team

Project Lead or Principal
Roslyn Cole – Aidlin Darling Design

Lead Architect, Engineer, or Designer Address
Tory Green – Aidlin Darling Design

Owner/Client
Melinda Sullivan – San Francisco Recreation & Parks Department

Architect/Landscape
Aidlin Darling Design

Structural Engineer
Dan Eilbeck – Wiss, Janney, Elstern Associates (WJE)

Mechanical Engineer
Jeff Blaevoet – Guttmann & Blaevoet

Civil Engineer
Eric Swanson – BKF Engineers

Green Building Consultant
Abenda Darden – Thorton Tomasetti

Landscape Architect
Scott Cataffa – Conger Moss Guillard (CMG) Landscape Architecture

Historic Preservation Consultant
Nancy Goldenberg – TreanorHL

Acoustical Consultant
Thomas Schindler – Salter Inc.

Code Consultant
Steve Winkel – The Preview Group

Specifications Consultant
John McCaffrey 

General Contractor
Wiss, Janney, Elstern Associates (WJE)

Theater and A/V Consultant
Mike McMackin – Auerbach Pollock Friedlander

Lighting Designer
Janet Nolan – JS Nolan + Associates

Geneva Car Barn & Powerhouse

Geneva Car Barn & Powerhouse is a winner for the 2021 Preservation Design Award for Rehabilitation. Award recipients are selected by a jury of top professionals in the fields of architecture, engineering, planning, and history, as well as renowned architecture critics and journalists. Tickets and sponsorship options are available at californiapreservation.org/awards.

About Geneva Car Barn & Powerhouse

Built in 1901 as the home of San Francisco’s first electric railway, the Geneva Car Barn & Powerhouse is one of the last physical reminders of the system. In 2009, an effort began to adaptively reuse the building as a community cultural and education center. Finished in 2020, the transformation of the Powerhouse into a 300-person event and performance space completes the first phase. The adaptive reuse of the Powerhouse highlights layers of history while deftly inserting new program elements into the historic shell. Due to the building’s decay and lack of seismic stability, every surface was touched in the rehabilitation. In adapting the Powerhouse as an arts event space, elements were introduced in a manner that respected the existing structure. Throughout the space, the interplay of new and old enlivens the reading of each, creating a revitalized historic building that serves the community while honoring its past.