About CPF

The California Preservation Foundation (CPF), a 501c3 nonprofit, was incorporated in 1978. We now support a national network of more than 20,000 members and supporters. Click here to learn how you can become a member.

Guerneville Bank Project Team

Project Lead
Crista Luedtke – boon-ito consulting

Owner/Client
Bob Pullum – owner

Architect/Landscape
Ingrid Emming – Designing Dimensions

Author & Title
Bob Pullum – owner

Historic Architect
Carl I. Warnecke – Miller & Warnecke

Landscape Architect
Christopher Reynolds – Reynolds-Sebastiani Design Services

Historic Preservation Consultant
Bob Pullum – owner

Contractor
Mark Gnat – General Contractor Lic # 912258

Additional Participant(s)
Margo Warnecke Merck – Warnecke Ranch & Archives

John Schubert – Russian River Historical Society

Jessica Hische

Damon Styer – New Bohemia Signs

James Weathers

Caleb Callahan – Caleb j Callahan Woodworking

Benjamin Sauder – Tile & Restoration

Alice Warnecke Sutro – Warnecke Ranch & Archives

Ray Barrio – Construction

Steve Triolo – Electric

Branon Zapp – Plumbing

Marcus Myres – Flooring FX

Darrin Rogers – Quality Painters

Historic Bank of Guerneville Building

The Historic Bank of Guerneville Building is the winner of a 2020 Preservation Design Award for Rehabilitation. Award recipients are selected by a jury of top professionals in the fields of architecture, engineering, planning, and history, as well as renowned architecture critics and journalists. The Award will be presented on Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at an online awards ceremony. Tickets and sponsorship options are available at californiapreservation.org/awards.

About this project

The Historic Bank of Guerneville Building, built in 1921,sat abandoned for nearly 30 years. Designed by John Carl Warnecke’s father, Carl I. Warnecke, the original building is an early example of Miller & Warnecke. Additions were added in 1954 & 1962, architect unknown. After the last owner died in 2014, a new owner started its rehabilitation. A restricted budget due to flood plain constraints by the Sonoma County Permit & Resource Management Department focused the work on essential elements to help return the building to service including ADA accessibility upgrades. Lack of retail spaces on Main Street in Downtown Guerneville influenced the final use of the building as a collective of local small businesses and include a small exhibit space for the local historical society. Many original elements were discovered and revealed during its rehabilitation including an original mosaic tile floor, hidden since the 1940s. Historical “easter egg” statements placed throughout the building help educate visitors.