Registration & Details

Details

  • $175 $87.50 (50% off for Preservation Month Only) Non-members Full Conference. Includes one year of Individual Membership ($50) 
  • $150 $75.00 (50% off for Preservation Month Only) Members Full Conference
  • $75 per day for Day 1 and Day 2
  • $95 per day for Day 3 (Professional Training Day)
  • Students FREE | Speakers FREE

Continuing education

All live programs qualify for continuing education units through the AIA, AICP, ASLA and CLG.  All attendees can take advantage of our continuing education program at no additional cost.

  • Many sessions qualify for Health, Safety, and Welfare units (HSW)
  • Some sessions will qualify for AICP legal and ethics credits

Register securely online through CPF’s Website: 

For More Information

Track Titles

With our online format we have an unprecedented opportunity to expand our programs and address the enormous issues facing heritage conservation in California and beyond. To do so, the focus of the conference programs will be based on a set of values that broadly define the challenges before us as preservationists:

    • Excellence & Innovation. Overcoming technical challenges using the latest and best practices in preservation.
        • Using tools and other knowledge to complete challenging projects.
        • Harnessing the power of new technology
        • Ensuring that preservation keeps abreast of new knowledge and discoveries
    • Imagination & Vision. Using creativity and gumption to move preservation in new directions.
        • Creative solutions to difficult preservation challenges
        • Coalition building
        • Storytelling
        • Thinking outside of the preservation box
        • Intersecting with other disciplines and finding common ground and common solutions.
    • Relevance. How can heritage conservation improve the quality of life? Sessions within this field will demonstrate and discuss preservation’s role in some of the following challenges of the 21st Century:
        • Housing
        • Environmental Justice
        • Immigration
        • Health
        • Education
        • Jobs
    • Repair. How do we address the process and result of erasure and painful moments in history?
        • Helping communities that have lacked preservation programs
        • Making “history right”
        • Addressing conflict and mistrust
        • Telling the untold
    • Technology Toolkit. Professional training webinars to get you ahead in current research and design methodologies.
Keynote Address

This year’s keynote address will include special programming on Tuesday morning at 9 AM in conversation with Robert G. Stanton, our nation’s first African American Director of the National Park Service. 

Robert G. Stanton, was born on September 22, 1940 in Forth Worth, Texas. His mother was a short order cook and his father was a hay contractor. He grew up in Mosier Valley, one of the oldest African American communities in Texas, settled by free slaves. He graduated from I.M. Terrell High School in Forth Worth in 1959.

He earned his bachelor’s of science degree from Huston-Tillotson College in Austin in 1963. The summer of his junior year in college he began his career with the National Park Service. Borrowing $250, he bought a train ticket to Wyoming and a park ranger’s uniform and worked as a seasonal ranger at Grand Teton National Park. Stanton, along with several other African Americans, was recruited by then Interior Secretary, Stewart Udall who traveled to predominately Black college campuses recruiting students.

In 1963, Stanton began his graduate studies at Boston University and went back to Huston-Tillotson to work as the director of public relations and alumni affairs from 1964 until 1966. That year, he took a full time job with the Park Service as a personnel management and public information specialist in the Washington, D.C. headquarters office. In 1969, he became a management assistant and in 1970, he was appointed superintendent of Virgin Islands National Park in St. Thomas. In 1974, Stanton became deputy regional director of the Southeast Region of the National Park Service in Atlanta and in 1976 he returned to Washington, D.C. as assistant director of park operations. In 1978, Stanton was named deputy regional director of the National Capital Region, where he remained until 1986. In 1987, he returned to headquarters as associate director for operations, and in 1988, he became the first African American to serve as director of the National Park Service. Stanton’s nomination for the post by former President Clinton was the first that had to be approved by the U.S. Senate…he was confirmed unanimously. He retired from that position in 2003.

Tuesday, June 8, 2021 - Online Programs

Value: Repair

Tuesday, 06/08/2021, 10:30 AM11:30 AM

Telling the Whole Story: Histories of Violence, Racial Justice, and Heritage Conservation

Californians inherit fraught histories of racial violence, state suppression, and civil unrest. This roundtable brings together practitioners and scholars to discuss how to confront places and stories associated with colonization, racism, and movements for racial justice. How does heritage conservation advance repair in BIPOC communities, and what roles do demolition and other forms of erasure play in how communities remember? In the absence of built heritage, what are the intangible ways that Californians memorialize, reckon with, and share knowledge about histories of violence and struggle? And how do we make room for joy and creation in these spaces?

Moderator

Laura Dominguez, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Southern California, Department of History

Speakers

Carson Anderson, Senior Historic Preservation Planner, City of Sacramento

Jackson Loop, Policy Coordinator, Southern California Association of Nonprofit Housing

Desiree Renee Martinez, MA, RPA, Tongva (Gabrielino), President, Cogstone Resource Management

Rosalind Sagara, Neighborhood Outreach Manager, Los Angeles Conservancy

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Value: Imagination & Vision

Tuesday, 06/08/2021, 10:30 AM11:30 AM

The Celebration of Inclusiveness Towards an Integrated Approach

Heritage professionals and community advocates in California have pioneered approaches in historic preservation by engaging socially diverse groups who have contributed vitally to the state’s cultural history. Intangible cultural heritage can only be heritage when it is recognized as such by the communities, groups or individuals that create, maintain and transmit it. In this track, participants will learn more about inclusive-oriented preservation and how preservationists work with communities to expand the boundaries of their practice.

Moderator

Milford Wayne Donaldson

Speakers

Reno Franklin

Luis Hoyos , Architect, State Historical Resources Commissioner,

Alison Rose Jefferson, Historian and Heritage Conservation consultant,

Michelle Magalong , Executive Director, Asian & Pacific Islander Americans in Historic Preservation

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Value: Repair

Tuesday, 06/08/2021, 12:00 PM1:00 PM

Black Lives Matter: Preserving Memories, Stories, and Expressions

In June 2020, thousands of Californians took to the streets in protest over the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The Black Lives Matter-led movement created a multitude of spontaneous monuments and murals. These physical memorializations should be preserved, but the historic preservation field does not have well-established language, methodologies, or tools for conserving these kinds of stories and resources in real time. How are Black artists and communities preserving, interpreting, and sharing stories about the BLM movement in California? What roles might historic preservation professionals play in supporting or amplifying those efforts? And how is this work changing narratives about community, resistance, and structures of oppression in California and the U.S. at large?

Moderator

Karen Mack, CEO, LA Commons

Speakers

Mizan Alkebulan-Abakah, MPH, Co-Creator and Executive Director, Spearitwurx

De’Ana Brownfield, Arts & Culture Coordinator, Black Cultural Zone

Karen Mack, CEO, LA Commons

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Value: Imagination & Vision

Tuesday, 06/08/2021, 12:00 PM1:00 PM

Preservation through Podcasts

Podcasts have the ability to delve into an array of topics that can inspire imagination and vision for the preservation, heritage conservation, and architecture fields. They provide a platform that can help us as professionals in these fields to communicate the work that we do to a broad audience. Join three hosts of preservation podcasts as they detail some of the salient issues they have addressed, why they chose podcasts as a platform to share their work, and some of the logistics behind this technology.

Moderator

Kristen Hayashi

Speakers

Catherine Meng, Host, Design Voice podcast

Liam O’Donaghue, Host/producer, East Bay Yesterday podcast

Cindy Olnick, Host, Save As podcast

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Value: Imagination & Vision

Tuesday, 06/08/2021, 1:30 PM4:00 PM

Expanding Local Narratives Through the California Cultural Districts Program

The California cultural districts program was founded to highlight communities with high concentrations of cultural resources and activities. Through the passing of AB 189 in 2016 and subsequent action by the California Arts Council, 14 pilot cultural districts were designated in 2017. The districts represent a wide-range of locations and communities throughout California and each district has a unique history and sense of place. In 2020, the program was set to receive its first funding from the State budget to build the capacity of the designated districts, but this funding was postponed due to shifting priorities during the COVID-19 pandemic.  What’s next for these communities as they attempt to keep forward momentum in celebrating their cultural resources, questioning outdated historical narratives, and building community through arts and cultural programming? What can we learn from the steps already taken and the priorities identified by the districts for the future? Stakeholders and organizers from a selection of the pilot cultural districts could discuss what the designation means for their communities, how they would like to see the program move forward, and what lessons they learned through the designation process that may apply to other communities in California and beyond.

Moderator

Eliza Tudor, Executive Director, Nevada City Arts Council, Grass Valley-Nevada City and Truckee Cultural Districts

Speakers

Shelly Covert, Spokesperson, Executive Director, Board Member, musician, Nevada City Rancheria Nisenan Tribal Spokesperson, Executive Director of the California Heritage: Indigenous Research Project, Board Member of the Nevada County Arts Council

Raquel RedondiezSoMa Pilipinas Cultural District

Julia Sabory, Cultural Districts Manager, San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development

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Value: Repair

Tuesday, 06/08/2021, 1:30 PM2:30 PM

LGBTQ+ Heritage: Wins, Losses, and Challenges

From San Diego and Los Angeles to San Francisco, LGBTQ+ history is increasingly being told and better understood through place-based approaches, but how do we go further by protecting these places and making the full stories known and visible for all to see? San Francisco’s 2016 adoption of its LGBTQ Historic Context Statement served as a critical milestone and challenged traditional interpretation of integrity standards. Now after five years let’s check back in to see how advocates are working to save the threatened home of pioneering lesbian rights activists Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon, and the latest with South of Market’s world renowned Leather District and Compton’s Transgender District.

Moderator

Alex Westhoff, Senior Planner, City of San Francisco

Speakers

Alex Westhoff, Senior Planner, City of San Francisco

Shayne Watson, Consultant, Watson Heritage Consulting

Honey Mahogany, Co-Founder, The Transgender District

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Value: Repair

Tuesday, 06/08/2021, 3:00 PM4:00 PM

Acknowledgement is Empowerment: Segregation from Redlining to Covenants

Redlining and racial covenants are two of the most prevalent racist practices used in the early-to-mid twentieth century to discriminate against and segregate communities of color. California was not immune to this nationwide display of racism, and only now are we beginning to fully understand this part of our past and reckon with its lasting legacy. Where do we start? Fully acknowledging this painful history and the people who incurred the harm is one way, to ensure a truthful understanding of how our communities developed over time, and why some parts remain segregated still today. Session participants will discover a range of tools such as historic context statements focused on race and suburbanization, interactive mapping, storytelling, and oral histories that produce tangible outcomes, tell this story, and begin to bring people together.

Moderator

Adrian Scott Fine (+ Sian Winship), Senior Director of Advocacy, Los Angeles Conservancy

Speakers

Sian [Co-Moderator] Winship, Preservation Consultant,

Sarah Jane Shoenfeld, Historian, Mapping Segregation in Washington DC

Sara C. Bronin, Thomas F. Gallivan Chair in Real Property Law and Faculty Director, Center for Energy and Environmental Law, University of Connecticut, School of Law

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Value: Special

Tuesday, 06/08/2021, 5:30 PM7:00 PM

Space Camp

Rocket nerds come one and all to this special evening program looking at a rocket testing facility in the mountains of Southern California. This site received one of the most extensive HAER documentation efforts in history, including a complete laser scan of massive rocket testing stands, virtual tours and panoramas, and a full large format photography survey as part of a mitigation effort prior to cleanup of the site. Santa Susana also contains “Burro Flats” a completely different historic place recognized a National Registered Historic Site in 2020 for its role as a Traditional Cultural Property (TCP). This fast-paced look at the space race will conclude with the stories that trace back millenia to the ancestral sacred sites of the Chumash, Gabrieleno, and Fernandeno tribes who are reclaiming the space through a National Register nomination. Don’t miss this evening look at a controversial historic landscape associated with many uses.

Wednesday, June 9, 2021 - Online Programs

Value: Excellence & Innovation

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 9:00 AM10:00 AM

Bunker Hill Refrain: New  Digital Tools for Public History and Crowdsourcing

Bunker Hill in downtown Los Angeles was once home to a vibrant residential community. The Bunker Hill Refrain project examines a USC archive collection of household survey cards compiled by the WPA in 1939 that provide a snapshot of this racially and ethnically diverse neighborhood prior to its erasure through urban renewal. Through the use of crowdsourced cataloguing, the archive is being mined for content and analysis has begun, transforming this hidden archival resource into accessible data for understanding the evolution of this place.

Moderator

Trudi Sandmeier, University of Southern California

Speakers

Meredith Drake Reitan, University of Southern California

Suzi Norchat

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Value: Relevance

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 9:00 AM10:00 AM

Relevance Roundtable: Community

Join us for a dialog on how heritage conservation is relevant through the lens of community. How do we talk about our work in a way that connects with people from all walks of life? Folks from a variety of perspectives (community, climate, and shelter) will talk with each other, and you, about the challenges of communicating our relevance, from deep-seated myths to valid concerns. No Powerpoints or formal presentations, just a conversation to start shifting the narrative to reflect the impact – and the promise – of preservation on our communities.

Moderator

Cindy Olnick

Speakers

Donna Graves

Louisa Van Leer, VanLeer Architecture

Dillon Delvo, Executive Director, Little Manila

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Value: Excellence & Innovation

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 10:30 AM11:30 AM

Reorienting the Narrative: CA’s pre-colonial history

Join a panel of experts to discuss decolonization and ways to re-center cultural resources management from an Indigenous perspective. Decolonization involves giving voice to Indigenous communities to both reframe historical narratives and reclaim spaces. This includes valuing and revitalizing Indigenous knowledge and approaches and eliminating assumptions that have impacted Indigenous ways of being.

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Value: Relevance

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 10:30 AM11:30 AM

Relevance Roundtable: Health

Relevance was a major issue for our field before the world changed; now, in the wake of Covid-19, it’s even more so. How do we connect the work we do in preservation to issues of health and environmental justice (lead paint/pollution, clean water, etc.)? What do we do with aging health infrastructure? How do historic places impact our well-being? What lessons can we learn (again) about healthy living? Folks from a variety of perspectives (community, climate, and shelter) will talk with each other, and you, about the challenges of communicating our relevance, from deep-seated myths to valid concerns. No Powerpoints or formal presentations, just a conversation to start shifting the narrative to reflect the impact – and the promise – of preservation on our health.

Moderator

Christina Dikas

Speakers

Eric Haas

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Value: Excellence & Innovation

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 12:00 PM1:00 PM

Reframing Integrity – Launching the Revolution

DRAFT – While most landmark programs consider both architectural and cultural landmarks, the evaluation of integrity is often weaponized to prevent the recognition of non-architecturally significant sites. As a result, only a small number of culturally significant sites have been designated at the federal, state, or local levels. Grab your lunch and join this lively roundtable discussion examining integrity from a variety of perspectives. This talk will also serve as the launch of a new CPF initiative to formulate practical integrity guidance for advocates and local governments.

Moderator

Adrian Scott Fine, Senior Director of Advocacy, Los Angeles Conservancy

Speakers

Christine LazzarettoHistoric Resources Group

Catherine Fleming Bruce

Ray Rast

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Value: Relevance

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 1:30 PM2:30 PM

Relevance Roundtable: Shelter

Join us for a conversation on the ways in which heritage conservation is relevant to our basic need for shelter. Through the lens of increasing homelessness, lack of affordability, and impending population growth, how can preservation shift from its elitist roots to address some of these pressing human needs? Folks from a variety of perspectives (community, climate, and shelter) will talk with each other, and you, about the challenges of communicating our relevance, from deep-seated myths to valid concerns. No Powerpoints or formal presentations, just a conversation to start shifting the narrative to reflect the impact – and the promise – of preservation on our basic need for shelter.

Moderator

Christine Lazzaretto

Speakers

Leslie Palaroan, Senior Project Manager, Satellite Affordable Housing Associates

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Value: Excellence & Innovation

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 3:00 PM4:00 PM

Sense(s) of Place: Exploring Olfactory and Auditory Heritage

What does a historic place sound like?  Does it have a distinctive smell? And do we have the tools to evaluate, document, and conserve these sensory character-defining features? Come make sense(s) of these aspects of cultural heritage conservation.

Moderator

Trudi Sandmeier, Director, Heritage Conservation Programs, USC School of Architecture

Speakers

Doyuen Ko, Associate Professor of Audio Engineering Technology, Belmont University

Kate McLean, Artist/Designer/Researcher/Mapper of Urban Smellscapes, Canterbury Christ Church University, UK

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Value: Relevance

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 3:00 PM4:00 PM

Relevance Roundtable: Climate

Climate change is accelerating and will have a major impact on our work  –  and we see it daily in California. A rise in extreme weather events, cycles of drought, and sea-level rise are rolling inexorably forward. How do we grapple with this enormous challenge through our work in preservation? Folks from a variety of perspectives (community, climate, and shelter) will talk with each other, and you, about the challenges of communicating our relevance, from deep-seated myths to valid concerns. No Powerpoints or formal presentations, just a conversation to start shifting the narrative to reflect the impact – and the promise – of preservation on our efforts to grapple with climate change.

Moderator

Alex Westhoff, Planner, City of San Francisco

Speakers

Lisa Craig

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Value: Special

Wednesday, 06/09/2021, 5:30 PM7:00 PM

Glowing Gases in Glass: Our Neon Heritage

Vintage neon signs have evolved from advertising to art, and now they serve as landmarks of the day-to-day human experience within communities. The artisans and advocates who take on these preservation projects deserve and desire public acknowledgment, and the opportunity to share experiences. SF Neon produces an annual Neon Speaks festival and symposium to bring neon preservationists and advocates together to celebrate and share information on historic neon restoration and preservation. Let’s celebrate this evening with these iconic under-recognized landmarks with our national guests who specialize in neon heritage!

Speakers

Randall Ann Homan, Neon Speaks

Al Barna, Neon Speaks

Thursday, June 10, 2021 - Online Programs

Value: Technical

Thursday, 06/10/2021, 9:00 AM10:00 AM

Evaluating and Restoring Historic Curtain Walls and Monumental Entrances

The speakers will describe several types of early to mid-twentieth century window walls/curtain walls, techniques for their evaluation and assessment, and critical factors in deciding on rehabilitation or replacement. Using examples from their personal experience with aluminum and bronze, they will explain how to develop technically and historically appropriate solutions for the repair and rehabilitation of historic curtain walls. The speakers will then explain how to preserve and restore metal finishes in the field.

Moderator

Carolyn Searls, Senior Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

Speakers

Matthew Bronski, Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

Rex Dean, Stuart Dean

Chris Incorvaia, Stuart Dean

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Value: Technical

Thursday, 06/10/2021, 10:30 AM11:30 AM

Protecting Historic Buildings and Components from Vibration Damage

Historic buildings and their contents are subject to potentially damaging vibrations from adjacent construction, traffic, and community events. Published vibration limits vary widely and are not directly applicable to historic building components. This panel will discuss completed vibration monitoring case studies of a historic district, individual buildings, and fragile building components (e.g. stained-glass windows, plaster ceilings, murals, free-standing displays, etc.) to highlight key lessons-learned and provide recommended best-practices for analyzing vibrations and setting limits.

Moderator

Carolyn Searls, Senior Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

Speakers

Carolyn Searls, Senior Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

Lena Currie, Senior Project Manager, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

Arne Johnson, Principal, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.

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Value: Imagination & Vision

Thursday, 06/10/2021, 10:30 AM11:30 AM

Investing in Community Heritage: Mitigation that Works

Mitigation measures for demolition projects are traditionally focused on architectural documentation in the form of expensive archival photography and a history report, or a set of interpretive displays. But how do we document a property that is important for intangible reasons–for the local events that occur there, for the community members who made their mark there, or for being a beloved community touchstone? What’s being lost is the connection that a community feels with its shared heritage. Are photos or interpretive panels the best we can do to mitigate for that loss? This session is the beginning of a conversation on how to advance our thinking in how we compensate for the loss of community assets. The City of San Antonio levies a fee by square-foot when a significant property is demolished. The City of San Francisco recently approved several community-led mitigation measures for its Better Market Street project. On other fronts, the City of San Francisco is working to develop mitigation standards that integrate diversity, equity, and inclusion objectives, and one federal agency has established a mitigation fund for impacts to tribal landscapes. This session explores the ways in which we might look at mitigating the loss of historic resources as an opportunity to invest in the preservation of community heritage.

Moderator

Susan Lassell, Senior Managing Director, Historic Preservation, ICF

Speakers

Gretchen Hilyard Boyce, Senior Manager/Historic Preservation Specialist, ICF

Allison Vanderslice, CEQA Cultural Resources Team Manager, Environmental Planning Division, San Francisco Planning

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Value: Excellence & Innovation

Thursday, 06/10/2021, 1:30 PM2:30 PM

Divine Illumination  –  Conservation of Terra Cotta Tracery and Stained Glass in Two California Churches

To be finalized by Caldwell.

Moderator

Una Gilmartin, Principal, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.

Speakers

John Fidler, President, John Fidler Preservation Technology, Inc.

Ariana Makau, President and Principal Conservator, Nzilani Glass Conservation

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Value: Excellence & Innovation

Thursday, 06/10/2021, 3:00 PM4:00 PM

Historic Windows  –  The Eyes to our Buildings

Historic window repair has been a preservation challenge for commercial and residential properties alike. Window products marketed to property owners attempt to make window replacement affordable and easy but selecting options for window replacement and repair can be difficult without relevant preservation experience. This session will focus on how the preservation community can educate owners to not only understand the importance that windows play in a building system, but how repair and replacement must be methodically approached. This session will include presentations from the public and private sectors – addressing policy, assessment, and historically appropriate repair and/or replacement.

 

We will discuss San Francisco’s process for historic window replacement and/or repair, highlighting the importance and need for greater outreach and education. SF trains planners to explain the importance of retaining the historic character and functionality of historic windows. We will include case studies that highlight wood and steel window visual and testing assessment, energy efficiency and treatment evaluations, and repair. We include the process deciding if repair or replacement is the best option. When addressing in-kind replacement, there are several products on the market, and this session will offer best practices for evaluating custom products. Case studies will also be provided that highlight how to select qualified contractors and identify cost factors such as access and hazardous materials.

Moderator

David Wessel, Principal, ARG

Speakers

Kelly Wong, Senior Preservation Planner, City & County of San Francisco

Megan Carver, Preservation Project Manager, ARG Conservation Services

Matthew Worster, Associate Principal, SGH

Jennifer Correia, Principal, ARG Conservation Services

Sponsorship

All New Benefits for 2021! You can network your company and get essential training opportunities for your staff. 

As a Conference Sponsor you will have access to widespread opportunities to promote your products and services to preservation professionals from across the country and internationally. Our reach extends to all 50 states and 14 countries.
Become a Conference Sponsor! Check out all our new online benefits HERE or click the image below.

Past Conference Programs

Interested in Our Past Programs? 

Click the year of the program below for all the fun details from the last three years at the CPF Annual Conference.

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2020 Online Conference Details
2019 Palm Springs Conference Details
2018 Palo Alto Conference Details